IHBC welcomes new RIBA report, recognition of LA roles and conservation accreditation: ‘Design Matters’

publication coverThe IHBC has welcomed conclusions in the new RIBA publication ‘showcasing the contribution of architects to the evolution of our built environment’, including ‘Encouraging the use of accredited conservation professionals as advisers and practitioners’ and ‘Ensuring that local authorities [LAs] have the skills and capacity to properly understand, manage and enhance the value of their historic buildings.’

Welcoming RIBA’s ‘Design Matters – Conservation, modernisation & Adaptation of existing buildings’, and its conclusions, IHBC Chair David McDonald said:  ‘It is very good to see that the RIBA is recognising and celebrating building conservation so substantially’.

‘I am particularly pleased to see that the report highlights the role of local authorities in conservation outcomes, and encourages the use of accredited conservation professionals, especially in public funded heritage projects.’

‘Included among the exemplar projects is the Piece Hall in Halifax which I have recently visited and which thoroughly deserves its Heritage Angels Award.’


The RIBA writes:

The buildings we live, work and play in are much more than a collection of masonry, metal, and glass. They are symbols which reflect our past and point us towards the future. Our built environment is shaped by our country’s culture, economy and society. Today, over 99% of the population of England (according to Historic England: Heritage and Society 2016) lives within a mile of a listed building, structure, or setting. Local heritage brings value, not just in terms of tourism, but by shaping our views of where we live, forming our communal identity and giving us a sense of place.

Our report showcases the contribution of architects to the evolution of our built environment – safeguarding heritage and securing its future.

There are many ways in which the Government can support and strengthen the protection of the historic environment for the future, including:

  1. Encouraging the use of accredited conservation professionals as advisers and practitioners through procurement requirements on publicly funded heritage projects
  2. Maintaining proper collaboration at central and local levels with international heritage organisations such as UNESCO, Europa Nostra and ICOMOS.
  3. Investing in developing and promoting the accreditation of architects with specialist knowledge, alongside widening access to the profession through the expansion of apprenticeships.
  4. Ensuring that local authorities  have the skills and capacity  to properly understand, manage and enhance the value of their historic buildings.

Read more….

Download the report

For more on local authorities and conservation services in England see the IHBC’s support

See also, from the IHBC in 2009: HOW TO CARE FOR PLACES AND PEOPLE: Towards a common standard in Historic Environment Conservation Services & Skills

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