MHCLG: Public attitudes to house building… findings from the British Social Attitudes survey 2017

paperPublic attitudes to house building: findings from the British Social Attitudes survey 2017 is a report from the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG) on public attitudes to house building based on questions from the British Social Attitudes survey 2017, which was published on 7 June.

MHCLG writes:

This report sets out findings from a number of public attitude questions asked on house building within the British Social Attitudes survey 2017…

  • In 2017, 55 per cent of people were supportive of new homes being built in their local area. This is consistent with the results from 2014 when 56 per cent of respondents were supportive, and shows that there has been an increase in support over time, up from 47 per cent in 2013 and 28 per cent in 2010.
  •  In 2017, 21 per cent of people were opposed to new homes being built in their local area. This is the same as in 2014, and less than the proportion of respondents who were opposed in 2013 (31 per cent) and 2010 (46 per cent).
  •  Net opposition, which is the percentage of those saying they are opposed minus those saying they are supportive, has reduced from 18 per cent in 2010 to -16 per cent in 2013 and to -34 per cent in both 2014 and 2017. This shows that in 2013, 2014 and 2017, the number of people supporting more homes being built in the local area was greater than the number opposing.
  •  In 2010, 5 per cent of respondents stated that they strongly supported more homes being built in their local area, this increased to 14 per cent in 2017.
  •  The strength of opposition to new homes decreased since 2010. In 2017, the proportion of respondents stating they would strongly oppose new homes being built in their local areas was 5 per cent, compared to 15 per cent in 2010….

The British Social Attitudes survey

  1. The British Social Attitudes survey measures the extent to which the attitudes, values and beliefs of the British public change over time. The survey has been run annually by the National Centre for Social Research (NatCen) since 1983 (apart from in 1988 and 1992 when its core funding was used to fund the British Election Study series). A variety of funders, including government departments, grant-giving bodies, other foundations and universities support the survey, enabling it to cover a wide range of social, economic, political and moral issues. Questions are designed to be relevant to policy debates but also to be repeated at regular intervals.
  2. The survey uses a robust methodology that is replicated each year meaning changes in attitudes can be reliably compared between years, although observed changes may not always be significant. The fieldwork for the survey involves computer-assisted interviews carried out face-to-face with respondents aged 18 or over living in households in Great Britain. The fieldwork in 2017 took place between July and November.
  3. The survey is designed to yield a representative survey of adults (aged 18+) in Britain. While the British Social Attitudes survey covers England, Scotland and Wales, this report presents data for England only.
  4. This report provides findings relating to public attitudes to house building as measured by the British Social Attitudes survey 2017. The analysis for this report has been carried out solely by the Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government (MHCLG). The findings provide evidence about changing attitudes to new house building across England since 2010, as well as preferences for owning and renting. A new question was also asked relating to public opinion on who should make decisions about where new homes should be built in local areas. It is not possible to directly attribute change in attitudes to government policy given the broad range of factors which might shape attitudes. However, the findings give context and are helpful in terms of monitoring changing public attitudes over the time.

Read the report

 

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