Civic Voice announces winners of the 2016 Design Awards

On 24 May, Civic Voice handed out 11 awards to a variety of high quality schemes and projects from across England, with the Master’s House, Ledbury, winning in the Restoration Category

Civic Voice writes:

The Civic Voice Design Awards give communities the opportunity to nominate and recognise new buildings, restoration and public realm projects in their local area. They were introduced in 2013 following a vote by Civic Voice members to demonstrate that civic societies and other community groups will accept new development when it responds positively to the local area.

Max Farrell, chair of the Civic Voice Design Awards judging panel said, ‘The design of the building or scheme is just one part of the story. What matters just as much is how it was developed. These winners each reflect many of the aims and ambitions of Civic Voice. – a commitment to placemaking through a collaborative approach pulling the public, private and voluntary sector together. The Civic Voice Design Awards are showing that communities do not just want to stand at the side and complain, they want to get involved and shape the places they live in’.

A total of 11 schemes across England received an award including Alder Hey Hospital, Liverpool and St Valentine’s Close, a housing development in Winchester.

The 2016 winners are:-

New Build Category

• Alder Hey Hospital, Liverpool (Overall Winner and Category Winner)
• Soho Multi-level Playground, London (Highly Commended)
• St Valentine’s Close, Winchester (Highly Commended)

Public Realm Category

• The Holywells Park Project, Ipswich (Category Winner)
• Eyesore to Artwork, Derbyshire (Highly Commended)
• Road of Remembrance War Poppies, Folkestone, Kent (Judges’ Special Mention)

Restoration Category

  • The Master’s House, Ledbury (Category Winner)
  • Briddlesford Lodge Farm Hop Kilns (Highly Commended)
  • The Old Grammar School, Coventry (Highly Commended)
  • Yarmouth Station, Isle of Wight (Highly Commended)
  • Scenic Railway, Dreamland, Margate (Judges’ Special Mention)

Max Farrell finished by saying, ‘People are not just asking for more and better designed buildings, they are demanding them. The best developers realise this and will succeed when they realise participation not consultation is the way forward. What we need in England is positive planning and I call on communities, developers, MPs and others in the sector to learn the lessons from this year’s Civic Voice Design Awards’.

Find out more about the Award Winners

Posted in Sector NewsBlog | Comments Off on Civic Voice announces winners of the 2016 Design Awards

TCPA report: NPPF viability test hinders affordable homes provision

A new report from the Town and Country Planning Association (TCPA), ‘Homes for all: Ensuring councils can deliver the homes we need’, shows only seven per cent of councils believe that the government’s starter homes initiative would help address their affordable housing need. 

TCPA writes:

A report on housing need in the UK published today by the Association for Public Service Excellence (APSE) and the Town and Country Planning Association (TCPA) calls for urgent Government action to deliver the homes needed in the UK.

In ‘Homes for all: Ensuring councils can deliver the homes we need’, 72% of councils think that the viability test laid out in the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) has hindered their ability to build social and affordable housing. 11% of councils think that the viability test will provide the numbers that we need to tackle the biggest housing crisis of a generation – an increase of 19% compared to a year ago.

Kate Henderson, Chief Executive of the TCPA said: ‘With 96% of councils describing their need for affordable homes as severe or moderate, and 89% worried that the extension of Right to Buy will lead to less affordable homes, it is clear that there is a real crisis.’

‘Councils are concerned that government policy is not enabling them to deliver genuinely affordable housing – we need to have a housing strategy that provides affordable homes to all people.’

The report sets out recommendations to tackle the challenges of providing the  necessary housing – 96% described their need for affordable housing as severe or moderate, and 87% of respondents did not think that starter homes will address the problem of affordability. It is recommended that the government puts in place a housing strategy that provides decent homes for everyone in society.

The report also recommends that councils are not forced to sell-off their social housing to fund the extension of Right to Buy – 9 out of 10 councils are worried that the extension of Right to Buy will lead to less housing available for social rent.

Paul O’Brien, Chief Executive of APSE said: ‘Our main message is we need Government to put in place a housing strategy for the nation that provides decent homes for all. Whilst efforts have been concentrated on so-called affordable homes this is often not the case and these homes remain out of reach for the vast majority of people.

‘The situation is even worse for those dependent on social and genuinely affordable housing for rent. Current housing policy is in need of demolition. The time has come to start afresh by putting local authorities and new council homes at the heart of a new housing strategy.’

The report also showcases innovation in local government, including effective new models of housing delivery, and the report calls for the government to give back control to local authorities over their investment plans, rents and assets.

This is the second housing research collaboration between the APSE and the TCPA. It follows a year on from the first study, ‘Housing the nation: ensuring councils can deliver more and better homes’. 

See the Town and Country Planning Association Press Release

Posted in Sector NewsBlog | Comments Off on TCPA report: NPPF viability test hinders affordable homes provision

Historic England Advice Notes (HEAN) 1-7 now online

Historic England Advice Notes (HEANs) 1-6 have all now been published on the Historic England website, supplemented now by the new HEAN 7 on Local Heritage Listing, while a HEAN on the Reconstruction of Heritage Assets has been issued for consultation with deadline 22 June. 

The notes are:

See the consultation on the ‘Reconstruction of Heritage Assets’, which closes on 22 June

Posted in Sector NewsBlog | Comments Off on Historic England Advice Notes (HEAN) 1-7 now online

Skills shortage continues to create higher wages for skilled bricklayers

A skills shortage in the construction sector has pushed the wages of bricklayers higher, according to new research for the Construction Skills Network of the Construction Industry Training Board (CITB), as figures show that those with bricklaying skills can now command as much as £25 an hour for their services.

The CITB writes:

‘The group’s latest study finds that bricklayer roles are proving particularly difficult for construction businesses to fill. In some instances, bricklayers are said to be earning a weekly sum of up to £1,000, with high wages notably on offer in London.

Figures from CITB’s Construction Skills Network report show that 2,870 bricklaying jobs will be created every year between now and 2020.

Highlighting the improved wages which are on offer to those with the right skills, REC chief executive Kevin Green said construction workers can now expect to earn £34 more each week compared to last year.

He added: ‘Our data indicates that some employers are increasing pay faster as the competition for skilled workers intensifies.’

On the one hand, Mr Green said the wage improvements offer good news for the country’s builders and tradespeople.

But on the other hand, he said the current situation poses questions about how sustainable the trend is.

The expert said: ‘The UK is close to full employment and building firms are already struggling to find the people needed for major infrastructure projects.’

Looking at the longer-term picture, Mr Green said efforts must be made to tackle ‘deep-seated skills shortages’ through measures including apprenticeships and improved careers guidance in schools.

Employers are also being urged to invest more in skills development, and more work experience opportunities could be made available across the construction sector.

Last year, CITB launched the industry’s careers website – Go Construct – to help highlight the wide range of career opportunities available in construction.

CITB also recently announced over £7.5 million in targeted project funding to address the industry’s critical skills needs.

Responding to the findings, a representative from the Government’s Business Department said ministers are keen to give construction firms the power to deliver high-quality apprenticeships.

The spokesperson said apprenticeships ‘deliver the skills employers and the economy need for growth’.’

Read the he Construction Skills Network report

Posted in Sector NewsBlog | Comments Off on Skills shortage continues to create higher wages for skilled bricklayers

Georgian Group’s Architectural Awards 2016 open

The Georgian Groups Awards are now open, rewarding those with the vision and commitment to restore Georgian buildings and landscapes, and including recognition for high-quality new buildings in Georgian contexts and in the Classical tradition, all with a closing date of 29 July.

The Georgian Group writes:

‘The Georgian Group’s Architectural Awards, sponsored by international estate agents Savills and are now in their fifteenth year. They recognise exemplary conservation and restoration projects in the United Kingdom. The 2016 Awards will be presented by Loyd Grossman, CBE at the RIBA in early November 2016.

Entries for the 2016 awards are now being invited. There is no entry fee. Schemes must be in the United Kingdom, Isle of Man or Channel Islands and must have reached practical completion between 1st January 2016 and 1st August 2016. For the purpose of the Awards, the term ‘Georgian’ embraces the period of classical ascendancy in Britain and is taken to mean 1660–1840. The award categories are: Restoration of a Georgian Country House; Restoration of a Georgian Interior; Restoration of a Georgian Building in an Urban Setting; Reuse of a Georgian Building; Restoration of a Georgian Garden or Landscape; New Building in the Classical Tradition; New Building in a Georgian Context.

The owner’s consent is a condition of entry. Please send a description of your project with a selection of images to david@georgiangroup.org.uk or to David McKinstry, The Secretary, The Georgian Group, 6 Fitzroy Square, London W1T 5DX by 5pm on Friday 29 July 2016.’

For further information, contact David McKinstry, Secretary: David@georgiangroup.org.uk

Posted in Sector NewsBlog | Comments Off on Georgian Group’s Architectural Awards 2016 open

IHBC’s ‘in case you missed it’: 6 months free NewsBlogs reminder

NewsBlog_HomepageAnyone in or beyond the heritage, development and cultural communities can now take a 6-month ‘taster’ of the IHBC’s membership benefits by signing up for our free email news updates – the IHBC’s celebrated NewsBlogs – and experience just one of the privileges of being a member of the IHBC.

For full details and links see the IHBC Newsblogs

And sign up here

In case you missed: 6 months free Newsblogs reminder

Posted in IHBC NewsBlog | Comments Off on IHBC’s ‘in case you missed it’: 6 months free NewsBlogs reminder

IHBC on HES charity and NDPB ‘Corporate Plan’: Being part of the Storify #HEStory

The IHBC has welcomed the launch of the first Corporate Plan for Historic Environment Scotland (HES), covering the period 2016-19 and setting out the vision and direction of the new charity and Non-Departmental Public Body (NDPB), with a contribution to the Storify ‘Be part of the #hesstory! 

Jane Ryder, Chair, Historic Environment Scotland, reported:

‘The plan sets out our vision and mission and our core values: Collaborative; Professional; Innovative; Open and Respectful. It also adopts five, key strategic themes, mirroring  those of Scotland’s first strategy for the historic environment, ‘Our Place in Time’: Lead, Understand, Protect, Value and Perform, explaining what these mean for HES, what we aim to deliver and how we plan to achieve this.
In conjunction with the plan’s launch, we have also rolled-out our new corporate website  and brand. Our new logo reflects our role as custodian of the built heritage and lead body for the historic environment, with the keystone of the arch crucial for the stability of the whole.

We have also produced a new informational video which explains how we will work with the sector to ensure the historic environment is cherished, understood, shared and enjoyed with pride by everyone.

We are looking to the future with ambition and confidence, with our Corporate Plan highlighting how protecting our past will help shape our future.

Working together, we can achieve that ambition for the benefit of Scotland as a whole.’

Get a copy of the plan

Find out more at Storify

Posted in IHBC NewsBlog | Comments Off on IHBC on HES charity and NDPB ‘Corporate Plan’: Being part of the Storify #HEStory

IHBC welcomes THA briefing on heritage and the EU

The IHBC has welcomed the briefing by The Heritage Alliance (THA), on ‘Heritage & the EU: how the EU impacts on our heritage in England’.

THA writes:

Like many umbrella bodies with diverse memberships, The Heritage Alliance is not taking a formal position on the EU Referendum. In advance of the outcome of the vote on 23 June 2016, The Alliance has, however, identified where the impact on our heritage, especially in the event of a Leave vote, deserves forward thinking.

There would be a minimum period after a Leave vote of two years during which time Britain would continue to abide by EU treaties and laws. But this would be a critical negotiating period when the heritage sector and other interests would be pressing the UK/English government for replacement, relaxation or compensatory measures within whatever new relationship was proposed.

Equally, in the event of a Remain vote, the impact of EU regulations and funding on our heritage might also demand renewed advocacy by the Alliance and others.

Areas to be considered range from VAT to state aid and from tourism to the digital economy. A final section brings together some of the comment from other sectors that relate to our heritage – the research community, the environmentalists and the voluntary sector.

See the briefing

Posted in IHBC NewsBlog | Comments Off on IHBC welcomes THA briefing on heritage and the EU

Round three for HLF Skills for the future programme

The Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) has announced a third round of its Skills for the Future programme, which will offer grants of £100,000 to £750,000 for projects providing paid work-based training placements to meet a skills shortage in the heritage sector and help diversify the workforce.

HLF writes:

Skills for the Future is a grants programme for projects which provide paid work-based training placements to meet a skills shortage in the heritage sector and help diversify the workforce. Grants will be from £100,000 to £750,000.

In two previous rounds, in 2010 and 2014, HLF awarded grants to 93 projects, investing £47m across the UK. To date, 40 projects have completed, over 1,700 trainees have been recruited and 1,300 of those have finished their placement.

On 24 June 2016, HLF will publish guidance and forms on our website when the programme opens to applications. There will be a two-round application process, with 29 September the deadline for first round applications.

See a list of recipients and more background

Pre-application workshops will be held through June and July across the UK, register HERE 

Read more….

Posted in Sector NewsBlog | Comments Off on Round three for HLF Skills for the future programme

New Ministerial responsibilities for Wales from May 2016

Delegation of responsibilities to the new Ministers in Wales includes both continuity and change, as Ken Skates takes the historic environment as Cabinet Secretary for Economy & Infrastructure, while planning comes under Lesley Griffiths,  as Cabinet Secretary for Environment & Rural Affairs, and housing falls to Carl Sargeant as Secretary for Communities and Children.

In addition, Mr Skates will retain responsibility for culture and tourism, which he held as a deputy minister in the last administration.  As Skates saw the Historic Environment Bill through the Assembly this brings welcome continuity. He also takes responsibility for Lottery expenditure.  A list of his responsibilities includes:

  • The provision of support and advice to assist the establishment, growth, modernisation or development of business in Wales;
  • The promotion of Wales as a location for business and investment;
  • The promotion of Welsh exports;
  • Entrepreneurship, enterprise and business information;
  • Finance Wales;
  • Social enterprise and the social economy;
  • Management of property assets held with the Economy Development portfolio and supporting the delivery of property infrastructure (sites and premises);
  • National Infrastructure Commission;
  • Transport policy
  • Funding and administration of programmes to Local Authorities and other bodies designed to deliver a range of transport schemes and services;
  • Ports policy;
  • Tourism in and to Wales, including the marketing and promotion of Wales as a tourist destination and regulation of the tourism industry;
  • National strategy and policy for the historic environment in Wales;
  • National strategy and policy for culture in Wales;
  • National Botanic Garden of Wales;
  • Creative Wales;
  • Non-devolved cultural property legislation and tax relief schemes;
  • Oversight of the distribution of Lottery funding within Wales.

Lesley Griffiths, meanwhile, assumes the planning portfolio with oversight and implementation of the Planning Acts and all aspects of planning policy and the determination of called-in planning applications and appeals.   In seeing The Planning (Wales) Act through she takes on the work of her predecessor, Carl Sergeant.  Griffiths’ responsibilities include:

  • National strategy and policy for Natural Resources Management
  • Cross-cutting measures of mitigation and adaptation in relation to climate change
  • Sustainable resource and waste management in Wales;
  • Energy policy;
  • Access to the countryside
  • Biodiversity policy
  • Forestry policy and legislation
  • Inland, coastal and sea fisheries
  • Marine and fresh water planning, biodiversity, conservation and licensing;
  • Oversight and implementation of the Planning Acts and all aspects of planning policy and the determination of called-in planning applications and appeals;
  • Planning gain – Section 106 Agreements contained in the Town and Country Planning Act1990;
  • Developments of National Significance: determination of planning applications and connected consents;
  • All aspects of Building Regulations;
  • Wales Spatial Plan and the National Development Framework;
  • Strategic lead on allotments and urban green infrastructure;
  • Local Environment Quality, including litter, fly-tipping, noise policy and regulation;
  • The Rural Development Programme;
  • Common Agricultural Policy Direct Payments and responsibility for cross-compliance;
  • Agriculture sector development, including wages and skills;
  • Developing agri-food sector, associated supply chains, promotion and marketing of food and drink from Wales;
  • Animal health and welfare;

Carl Sargeant, who was formerly Natural Resources Minister, now takes responsibility for housing and for communities as Communities and Children Secretary.  His portfolio includes:

  • Children’s and young people’s rights and entitlements,
  • Communities First;
  • Regeneration, including Strategic Regeneration Areas; legacy regeneration; and provision of sites and premises, derelict land and environmental improvements relating to regeneration;
  • The housing and housing-related activities of Local Authorities and housing associations
  • The Voluntary Sector and Volunteering.

See a full list of Cabinet appointments

Posted in Sector NewsBlog | Comments Off on New Ministerial responsibilities for Wales from May 2016

BEFS on ministerial appointments in Scotland for 2016-17

Built Environment Forum Scotland (BEFS) has offered its review ministerial appointments in Scotland following the First Minister’s announcement of her new Cabinet Secretaries for the 2016-17 sitting of the Scottish Parliament, as the historic environment remains with Fiona Hyslop within the Culture, Tourism and External Affairs portfolio.

The Planning portfolio is lodged with Angela Constance within Communities, Social Security and Equalities.  BEFS has written to Ms Hyslop and Ms Constance to ask for a meeting and over the next few months intend to contact all MSPs elected in May.

BEFS writes:

‘Ms Hyslop has held the historic environment within her remit for over 6 years, since December 2009, outstripping all her predecessors by far. Patricia Fergusson held it for the second longest at just under 2 1/2 years. There can be no denying that Ms Hyslop knows the heritage landscape well and not only do we look forward to working with her and the Culture and Historic Environment Division, we are very interested to find out how the SNP Manifesto commitments for the historic environment will be delivered. 

Cabinet Secretary for Culture, Tourism and External Affairs: Fiona Hyslop MSP
Culture and the arts, Broadcasting, Architecture, Built Heritage, National identity, Cross government co-ordination on bringing major events to Scotland, National records, Fair trade, Tourism, International development, Cross-government co-ordination on European Union and international relations, Scottish diaspora.

The SNP Manifesto committed to: ‘2017 is our Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology and we will work with Historic Environment Scotland and partners to create a long-term Infrastructure Investment Plan for restoring, enhancing and conserving our built heritage environment. We will support Historic Environment Scotland, as it takes forward the nation’s first Historic Environment Strategy.’

Tourism has been added to this portfolio which is timely given the opportunity 2017 presents the heritage sector. The long-term Infrastructure Investment Plan for restoring, enhancing and conserving our built heritage environment should be welcome news and an area we are currently seeking detail on. It also appears to fall within the remit of the Cabinet Secretary for Economy, Jobs and Fair Work, Keith Brown MSP. 

Cabinet Secretary for Finance and the Constitution: Derek Mackay MSP
Scottish Budget, Fiscal policy, Taxation, Budgetary monitoring and reporting, Scottish Public Finances and their sustainability, Public sector pay and pensions, Scottish Futures Trust, Efficient government, Public Bodies Policy, National Performance Framework, Registers of Scotland, Government procurement, Digital Public Services, Constitution.

The work of the Scottish Futures Trust in analysing the assets of public bodies and advising on their disposal and/or redevelopment is of relevance to communities of interest and place. BEFS is currently working on a recommendation on the National Performance Framework with the Measuring Success Working Group but we understand there may be a more systemic review of Scotland Performs in this parliament. No doubt the Forum will wish to see the historic environment retained within the Framework.   

Cabinet Secretary for Communities, Social Security and Equalities: Angela Constance MSP
Welfare policy, Community empowerment, Devolution to Communities and Reform of Local Government, Equalities, Religious and faith organisations, Protection and development of Social and Human Rights, Third sector and social economy, Democratic renewal, Local government, Housing, Homelessness, Community planning, Planning, Business improvement districts, Town centres, Building standards, Social security, Implementation of new powers, Measures against poverty, Disabilities, Older people.

View the complete list of appointments in Scotland for the coming term

See the BEFS report and further details

Posted in Sector NewsBlog | Comments Off on BEFS on ministerial appointments in Scotland for 2016-17

Delisting of Hepworth’s Epidauros II at St Ives: it’s a chattel, not a building!

Historic England (HE) notes that, while the strong artistic and historic significance of Barbara Hepworth’s Epidauros II, an important rounded, pierced bronze sculpture overlooking the sea in her hometown, St. Ives, was recognised when it was listed in 1998, a recent enquiry about the legal status of the sculpture prompted a review of its listing status.

HE writes:

Although the position for the Epidauros sculpture was carefully considered when it was placed in its present location by Hepworth herself, it was placed there on loan. As such it must be considered a chattel, and not a building in law, and it is therefore ineligible for listing. While no documentation survives from when it was listed, beyond the National Heritage List entry, we think it is most likely the case that the sculpture was listed in the mistaken assumption that it was a permanent fixture.

DCMS has now decided, on the advice of Historic England, to remove the Epidauros sculpture from the National Heritage List for England.

Sophie Bowness on behalf of the Hepworth Estate, said: ‘We are absolutely committed to keeping ‘Epidauros’ in the beautiful site overlooking St Ives that Hepworth chose for it in 1973. De-listing will enable us to offer the sculpture to the nation through the Acceptance in Lieu system. If accepted, ‘Epidauros’ would remain in perpetuity in this historic site.’

‘The delisting does not mean that we think that the sculpture lacks artistic importance, and it of course retains its intrinsic interest. If in the future the ownership situation changes, then it could be reassessed for listing

Sculptures on loan may not be capable of being listed under the 1990 Act.’

If you are aware of a listed sculpture that is on loan then please bring it to the attention of Historic England by emailing designation@HistoricEngland.org.uk so we can review its listing.

Read more….

Posted in Sector NewsBlog | Comments Off on Delisting of Hepworth’s Epidauros II at St Ives: it’s a chattel, not a building!

Matched crowdfunding pilot tender from HLF, DCMS etc.

Arts Council England, the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF), Nesta and DCMS are commissioning a crowdfunding platform to develop a match fund, to be hosted on a pre-existing platform, in order to experiment with match funding models in the arts and heritage sectors, with an invitation to tender is currently out with a deadline of 7 June.

The programme will seek to generate impact through selecting and financially supporting a number of arts and heritage projects. Through this process it will also develop insight into how these sectors can best engage with crowdfunding platforms and processes in the future, developing capacity within this field, along with understanding the profile and motivations of donors.

It will be used to develop evidence and recommendations on how crowdfunding can be used by public bodies to achieve impact and support their respective sectors in the best ways possible.

An invitation to tender is currently out with a deadline of 7 June 2016

Posted in Sector NewsBlog | Comments Off on Matched crowdfunding pilot tender from HLF, DCMS etc.

Clark blocks green belt solar farms for harm to visual amenity and LB settings

The Communities Secretary dismisses appeals for two solar farms, in Worcestershire and Essex, as neither demonstrated the very special circumstances needed to justify development in the green belts and would harm the landscape character, visual amenity and setting of Listed Buildings (LBs).

The Planning Portal writes:

‘Communities Secretary Greg Clark has dismissed appeals for two separate solar farms, each proposed for green belt locations, one in Worcestershire and the other in Essex. In both cases the planning inspectors who held the recovered appeal inquires had recommended that the projects should be refused.

The Worcestershire project involved an 8.9 megawatt solar farm scheme on a single site straddling the boundary between Wychavon District Council and Bromsgrove District Council. Both planning authorities had rejected the project.

In his decision letter Greg stressed that the project represented inappropriate development in the green belt which would cause ‘harm to the landscape character and visual amenities of the area and to the setting and significance of listed buildings’.

He concluded that the very special circumstances needed to justify the development in the green belt had not been demonstrated.

In respect of the other scheme, a five megawatt solar power facility proposed for a farm at Hutton, Essex refused by Brentwood Borough Council, the Secretary of State placed substantial weight on the ‘harm that would arise to the green belt by way of inappropriateness, loss of openness and the encroachment into the countryside’.

Clark, again, concluded that the very special circumstances necessary to justify the development in green belt did not exist.

View the recovered appeal: Rectory Farm, Rectory Lane Upton Warren, Worcestershire

View the recovered appeal: Havering Grove Farm, 552A Rayleigh Road, Hutton, Essex

Read more at Planning Portal

Posted in Sector NewsBlog | Comments Off on Clark blocks green belt solar farms for harm to visual amenity and LB settings

One of Churchill’s Secret Wireless Stations scheduled

A Second World War underground wireless station in Norwich, which was part of a secret communications network set up in 1940 by Churchill in response to the increasing threat of German invasion, has been protected as a scheduled monument by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport on the advice of Historic England.

Historic England reports:

Discovered in 2012 by a retired groundsman in the gardens of a Norwich country house, this wireless station, also known as an IN-Station or Zero Station, is thought to be one of just 32 built in England during the Second World War.

This is one of the most intact examples discovered so far, complete with a fake bookcase to conceal the wireless room and an escape tunnel.

In July 1944 3,500 civilians had been trained and over 125 civilian-run OUT-Stations had been established, often hidden in dugouts or behind dummy walls in houses. In this same month the ‘Special Duties’ branch was closed down, equipment stripped from the stations and their entrances hidden.

Details about their locations and construction were kept secret and very little documentation of the stations exists. Information was protected in case they should be needed again in the future.

Historic England is asking the public to come forward with information about family members who were trained to be a civilian spies, or any clues as to where the remaining 20 IN-stations lay hidden.’

If anyone has any information they can get in touch by emailing communications@HistoricEngland.org.uk

The full HE report

The Coleshill Auxiliary Research Team’s report on the IN-Station when it was discovered

The full entry on the National Heritage List

Posted in Sector NewsBlog | Comments Off on One of Churchill’s Secret Wireless Stations scheduled

IHBC, Place Alliance and other key BE bodies push ‘stand out’ recommendations from ‘Building Better Places’ to SOS for CLG

Building Better PlacesIn advance of the Government’s response to the House Of Lords Select Committee paper ‘Building Better Places’, key Built Environment (BE) organisations and members of the Place Alliance, including the IHBC, have written to Greg Clark, Secretary of State (SOS) for Communities and Local Government (CLG), calling for a focus on its ‘stand out’ recommendations.

As well as the IHBC, signatories to the Place Alliance initiative include the Academy of Urbanism, Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation, Design Council-CABE, Landscape Institute, Royal Institute of British Architects, Royal Town Planning Institute and the Urban Design Group, while headline priorities include:

  • Appoint a Chief Built Environment
  • Establishing a high level architecture and place policy
  • Promoting the health and well-being impacts
  • Adoption of Manual for Streets
  • National Infrastructure Commission publicising local design impacts and local engagement
  • Using Design Review for major developments
  • New ‘Permission in principle’ should give due regard to design quality and place-making
  • Encourage joint spatial frameworks and cross-boundary cooperation on ‘larger than local’ planning.

Professor Matthew Carmona, Chair of Place Alliance said: ‘This coming together of key institutes and organisations from the across the built environment sector sends a powerful message to Government that, first, more needs to be done to demonstrate the national commitment to place quality, and second, whilst we may not all agree on every detail in the House of Lords Select Committee’s report, the main thrust of its recommendations should be taken seriously by Government and especially the eight we highlight’.

‘Collectively the organisations also offer to play a role in helping the Government to consider the report.’

Place Alliance writes:

‘Building Better Places’ was issued on 19 February 2016 (HL Paper 100) by the House of Lords Select Committee on National Policy for the Built Environment.  The Committee was appointed ‘to consider the development and implementation of national policy for the built environment, and to make recommendations’.  The resulting report is the first to be issued by this new Select Committee, and contains over sixty conclusions and recommendations.

The recommendations singled out by the organisations as particularly important are (following their order in the report):

  • Appoint a Chief Built Environment Advisor within government to help co-ordinate policy, to act as a champion for design and to promote good practice beyond government [Paragraph 84]
  • Establishing a high level architecture and place policy for England [Para 89]
  • Promoting the health and well-being impacts of the built environment in a more integrated way across local authorities [Para 99]
  • Encouraging the adoption of Manual for Streets by highways authorities [Paragraph 110]
  • The National Infrastructure Commission should publicise its approach to local design impacts and local engagement [Para 123]
  • Incentivising decision makers to more systematically use Design Review for major developments [Para 130]
  • The new process of Permission in principle should give due regard to design quality and the key components of place-making [Para 148]
  • Giving further encouragement to joint spatial frameworks and cross-boundary cooperation on ‘larger than local’ planning [Para 413] 

The Place Alliance is a movement which emerged following the Farrell Review of architecture and the built environment (2014).  It brings together organisations and individuals who share a belief that the quality of our built environment has a profound influence on people’s lives.’ 

For further information please contact placealliance@ucl.ac.uk

Twitter: @PlaceAllianceUK

www.placealliance.org.uk

16 May 2016 Place Alliance Press Release

Posted in IHBC NewsBlog | Comments Off on IHBC, Place Alliance and other key BE bodies push ‘stand out’ recommendations from ‘Building Better Places’ to SOS for CLG