ETL: Share your knowledge of England’s buildings ‘enrich the list’

Historic England has launched a revised version of the web pages ‘Enrich the List’ on 7 June 2016, and now invites input to this critical tool from IHBC members and any others.

Historic England urges users of the list across professions and communities to add to the considerable resource which is the list and ensure that the information should not be static as our knowledge changes.  With more than 400,000 entries from milestones to tower blocks, sculpture to street furniture, Historic England have found that 99% of England’s residents live within a mile of a listed building.  The list also serves as an invaluable record of the historic environment.

Historic England explains:

‘Following the HER Forum in the Spring, the site has been development and Beta Tested to take on board feedback received, so that the new site launched today is easier to use and still more valuable’.

read more….

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Celebration of the restoration of York’s heritage made its mark at RHS in Chelsea, May 2016

A stained glass window, inspired by the medieval Great East Window at York Minster, formed the centrepiece of an installation at the Royal Horticultural Show (RHS) in Chelsea, celebrating the restoration of York Minster’s fine heritage.

The RHS writes:

‘A Garden for Yorkshire showcases the county’s wealth of stunning scenery, iconic heritage, deep-rooted industries and skilled tradespeople.

Inspired by the medieval Great East Window at York Minster, which is nearing the end of a 10-year restoration, the garden features a 5 x 3m panel of stained glass made using the same methods employed in 1405. Despite its ancient inspiration, the garden mixes the old and new, with state of the art technology used in the construction of the garden buildings alongside the 600 years of living history from the York glaziers and stonemasons.

The planting on the upper level celebrates the woodland gardens in the county, while the central perennial planting is inspired by, and designed to echo, the stained glass at the Minster.’

The garden was winner of the Best Show Garden award and was a Silver medal winner.  It was designed by Matthew Wilson, and built by Aire Valley Landscaping Services.  Welcome to Yorkshire sponsored the installation.

read more….

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IHBC-HTF Conservation Practice survey 2016 Summary Report: consensus and challenge in practice and policy!

 

IHBC Flickr image 1The summary report on the 2016 joint survey by the IHBC and the Historic Towns Forum (HTF) has been released, with strong consensus on key issues, such as that professional conservation practice is about reconciling ‘special interest’ with use and adaptation, not ‘mainly about understanding significance’, and on the challenges faced, such as those generated by differing legal interpretations of the term ‘significance’ in policy, guidance & practice.

Dave Chetwyn, HTF Chair and IHBC past Chair said: ‘The survey demonstrates the wide and complex context against which conservation professionals operate. The overwhelming consensus appears to be that heritage is a positive force for delivering growth, not a barrier, as is often portrayed.’

IHBC Director Sean O’Reilly said: ‘Clearly there are serious failings in the current heritage landscape, as it should be about helping to integrate conservation practice and policy into an accessible and coherent process suitable for public use and scrutiny. Instead the evidence seems to suggest that practice and policy are increasingly going down separate paths. This can only make the entire process of heritage care, management and change even more challenging for all players: practitioners, clients, users and stakeholders.’

Fiona Newton, IHBC’s Projects Officer, said: ‘Respondents from all professional backgrounds agreed that lack of suitable skills in both local government and construction and lack of funding were key challenges for building conservation practice’

Download the report

Background to the survey

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IHBC Annual School, Worcester 2016 – a few residential places still available, plus non-residential and the Day School

Book now to explore:

  • How communities are integral to the conservation and regeneration of historic places.
  • The diversity of those involved: practitioners, key personnel, the community groups and trusts directly involved with their local heritage
  • The impact of people and their passion for the historic environment on its future
  • How to ensure the continuation of ‘people power’ to safeguard heritage for all

Find out more and book your place at Worcester2016.ihbc.org.uk

Background to IHBC Annual Schools

For sponsorship and exhibition deals please contact Fiona Newton, projects@ihbc.org.uk

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New CEO appointed at HES as new board members sought

Historic Environment Scotland (HES) has appointed its new CEO, Alex Paterson, from Highlands and Islands Enterprise (HIE) and seeks new Board Members.

HES writes:

‘Alex brings a wealth of experience as the current Chief Executive of Highlands and Islands Enterprise, and as an acknowledged leader within the public sector in Scotland. His background in community investment and engagement combined with expertise in organisational development and change management means he is ideally placed to lead HES at this exciting phase of our development.

Alex will be joining us in September, meanwhile David Mitchell will continue as our Acting Chief Executive. David’s priorities include undertaking vital investment planning as we prepare for the next Spending Review, and introducing some organisational structural changes – announced last week – which have the full support of the Board.

The HIE biography gives more detail on Alex’s background: ‘Alex Paterson took up the post of Highlands and Islands Enterprise Chief Executive on 2 August 2010. Alex joined HIE in 2001 as Director of Developing Skills. In this post, he played a key role in modernising HIE’s approach to skills development and delivery and helping individuals gain or enhance their skills. Achievements included introducing the innovative LearningWorks online resource and integrating the national Careers Scotland service with the work of the enterprise agency. Following the Enterprise Networks Review in 2008, Alex was appointed as HIE’s first Director of Regional Competitiveness. He led the organisation’s support for key national sectors – education and universities, creative industries, energy, food and drink, life sciences, sustainable tourism, and financial and business services – as well as initiatives to develop UHI, improve the region’s infrastructure, enhance international trade performance, and promote business innovation, entrepreneurship and the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) programme.

Alex is a graduate of the University of Strathclyde and the University of Bath, and spent his early career in industrial marketing with Esso Chemicals and Volvo. After this, he joined the Scottish Development Agency and, on the formation of Scottish Enterprise, became Head of Small Business Development in Renfrewshire Enterprise. Before joining HIE, Alex was Managing Director of a consultancy and training organisation based in Glasgow and operating throughout the UK.

See a biography

Two new board members are being sought, see ref 1058

Read more….

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New research questions local plan housing supply claims

A report by Indigo Planning casts doubt on the ability of councils to meet housing supply targets in England under current parameters.

The Planning Portal writes:

‘New research has highlighted a gulf between the housing supply claimed by English planning authorities and the reality on the ground which depends on sites without planning permission.

This assessment by independent consultancy Indigo Planning casts doubt on the ability of councils to ensure new housing will meet identified need in local plans which are central to the government’s housing policy and, crucially, current supply targets. Councils now face a deadline of next year for publishing their local plans.

The research found that:

  • 67 per cent of local planning authorities (LPAs) report being able to demonstrate five years’ supply or more
  • 8 per cent of LPAs recognise they don’t have a five year supply
  • 5 per cent of LPAs have no up-to-date five year supply data.

The consultancy also noted that that 52 per cent of LPAs were able to demonstrate five years supply or more of housing sites.

However this assessment also showed a reliance on sites without permission. This is what the researchers found:

  • 88 per cent of LPAs rely on homes without planning permission in the supply
  • 66 per cent of LPAs rely on homes without planning permission making up at least one years’ worth of supply
  • 33 per cent of LPAs rely on homes without planning permission making up over two years’ supply.
  • Overall the average number of years’ worth of homes without planning permission in their supply was 1.7 years.

Simon Neate, chairman of Indigo Planning, said: ‘The task ahead of local authorities in the next two years is huge. Even those with work well underway will find it a challenge to complete everything on time when resources are so stretched. ‘In itself, the plan-led system is right. But after years in which some authorities appear to have attached less importance to the need for this process, very few are meeting their housing targets.’

Download the report

Read more at Planning Portal

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LGO chastises Hackney for failing to action enforcement

The Local Government Ombudsman (LGO) has called for planning authorities to ‘keep track of enforcement action, and follow through when they promise to act’, following findings of delay and protracted cases at Hackney Council reported on 10 May 2016.

The LGO writes:

A recent report issued by the LGO highlights the impact failing to enforce planning breaches can have on people’s lives. It shows the problems that can occur when councils do not take decisive enforcement action, manage resources properly and do not keep neighbours up-to-date on progress.

The message comes after a man complained that London Borough of Hackney spent more than five years unsuccessfully trying to get his neighbour to remove an unauthorised extension.

Throughout this time, the neighbour failed to comply with orders made by the Crown Court, continued to build, and prevented council contractors from removing the unlawful extension, which neighbours describe as an ‘eyesore’.

The man’s neighbour started building work in May 2006 and the first enforcement noticed was served in March 2009. The man bought his house in 2010, confident that the council would enforce the action. However, the extension remains in place.

The extension imposes on the man’s privacy; a balcony overlooks his bedrooms and garden, and has affected his own plans to extend his property.

The man complained to the LGO about delay and the council not keeping him updated on their action. The LGO’s investigation found that time and again it has been left to the man to chase the council for an update on its actions and to find out what was happening. The council failed to keep in touch even after it promised to improve communications.

The LGO’s investigation identified a backlog of 1,500 open enforcement cases within Hackney, some dating back to 2001. The council has since allocated two officers to go through all historic open cases to decide what further action should be taken.

The council appointed specialist contractors in December 2015 which have now moved on site to remove the extension.

Local Government Ombudsman, Dr Jane Martin, said: ‘The public can only have trust that their local council will protect them and their local environment if those councils act swiftly and appropriately to maintain planning control. People may therefore feel justifiably aggrieved if their local council promises to take direct action against unlawful development, but then lets them down. I acknowledge this was a difficult situation for the council and recognise that they have improved their communication over the past six months. I now hope the action the council is taking to clear its backlog of cases highlighted by my investigation will help to ensure this situation does not happen again.’

Download the Ombudsman’ report

Read more at lgo.org… and at LocalGovernmentLawyer

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Renovation disaster as £700k house in Lewisham collapses during building work

A house in Lewisham collapsed in thirty minutes on 8 June amidst building works for its renovation.as The Telegraph reports that the ‘renovation of a £700,000 house bought as a ‘doer-upper’ in south-east London turned into a nightmare when it collapsed during building work.’

The Telegraph writes:

Architect Ted Aston, 55, also told the newspaper: ‘The roof of the building was leaning over the street, the corner of the road was cordoned off and they weren’t letting anyone near it. I spoke to a police officer outside and she told me next door had been evacuated, as she understands it, all of the internal walls have been removed. These building are nearly 100 years old and even though some partitions appear to be non-load bearing, some of the partitions become part of the whole building.’

Read more….

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RIBA seeks nominations for inspiring teaching

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is inviting nominations for the Annie Spink Award for outstanding contribution to architectural education, with a deadline for nominations of 5pm, Thursday 15 September 2016.

The RIBA writes:

The award is funded by the Annie Spink Trust Fund, bequeathed to the RIBA in 1974 by architect Herbert Spink FRIBA as a lasting memorial to his late wife Annie and as an honour for the advancement of architectural education.

Past winners of the Annie Spink Award include Florian Beigel, Nigel Coates, Peter Cook, David Greene, Dean Hawkes, Andrew MacMillan, Isi Metzstein, Wolf Prix, Peter Salter, Dalibor Vesely, and Elia Zenghelis.

The biennial award is open to individuals or groups teaching in a school that offers RIBA validated courses in the UK or internationally.

Nominees must have made a substantial contribution to architectural education over a number of years, be involved in the development of architectural education and be directly engaged in the processes of teaching and learning.

Deadline for nominations: 5pm, Thursday 15 September 2016.

Winners of the award receive the Annie Spink trophy and £10,000. The President of the RIBA will present the Annie Spink award at a ceremony at the RIBA in London on 6 December 2016.

Read the press release

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Small northern cities add £82bn to economy annually

The North’s small and medium-sized cities (SMCs) contribute more than Wales and Northern Ireland combined to the UK economy every year – but they need to be better connected to the bigger cities, says a report from the thinktank IPPR North.

LocalGov writes:

The report, entitled City systems: the role of smaller towns and cities in growing the Northern Powerhouse, also revealed growth rates in the 20 SMCs with populations over 75,000 match levels seen in major cities.

IPPR does, however, argue that many SMCs do face significant challenges from not being better connected to bigger cities, and urges Whitehall to review the ‘London-centric’ system of transport funding which favours major cities.

The report also recommends the Government treat SMCs in a manner similar to how it treats small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) with bespoke support to foster local strengths.

Ed Cox, director of IPPR North, said: ‘In the same way small and medium businesses are now seen as vital to the British economy and the success of our big companies, we need to refocus policy on the North’s small and medium towns and cities, and not just the big cities – vital as they are.

‘The evidence shows this is not ‘jam-spreading’ resources thinly but economically the right thing to do: Manchester needs a prosperous Wigan to succeed, and vice-versa.’

A report last month warned the Northern Powerhouse will only succeed if more resources are spent on underperforming cities in the region.

Read more….

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High court case linked to demolished illegal moTudor home adjourned as compliance awaited

A High Court hearing has been adjourned until 4 July to give the Surrey farmer who built a now-demolished illegal mock Tudor home at a green belt location more time to remove a patio, garden wall, steps and pond, as ‘to fully comply with the Court Order [Mr Fidler] must demolish all the unlawful structures completely and return the land to its former state’.

Reigate and Banstead, BC writes:

A High Court hearing to decide whether Mr Fidler has complied with the court order requiring him to demolish the unlawful house and structures at Honeycrock Farm has been adjourned to 4 July 2016.

A High Court hearing to decide whether Mr Fidler has complied with the court order requiring him to demolish the unlawful house and other unauthorised structures at Honeycrock Farm, has been adjourned until Monday 4 July 2016.

The Judge, Mr Justice Dove, agreed to the Council’s application to adjourn his judgment for a further four weeks to give Mr Fidler the opportunity to fully comply with the Order.

A spokesman for the Council said: ‘At our recent site visits, we were pleased to see that demolition of the house and conservatory are well advanced. However, the patio, garden wall, steps and pond, which are also subject to the Court Order and enforcement notices, remain. This means Mr Fidler remains in contempt of court. To allow Mr Fidler a little extra time to fully comply with the Court Order, we applied to the Court to request a four week adjournment for him to complete the work.

‘For Mr Fidler to fully comply with the Court Order he must demolish all the unlawful structures completely and return the land to its former state.

‘We hope that Mr Fidler heeds the Judge’s comments and removes the remainder of the unlawful structures and restores the land as described by the enforcement notices. This must be done before the 4 July, which Mr Fidler has agreed to do.

‘We have always only sought full compliance with our enforcement notices. If we had failed to act in this case, it would give others free reign to build in the Green Belt without fear of recrimination. 

‘We are committed to protecting the borough’s character and will take firm action against anyone who deliberately flouts planning rules.

‘Mr Fidler previously admitted that he deliberately set out to circumvent planning rules. Also, he had another home on the site when he began building the unlawful one.

‘We have given Mr Fidler advice about his the options for providing alternative accommodation in existing lawful buildings on his site, which he has so far not pursued.’

The Council will make a site visit prior to 4 July to check that Mr Fidler has complied with the Court Order and outstanding enforcement notices and provide an update to the High Court. If they have not been complied with then the court hearing will proceed and the Judge, Mr Justice Dove, will decide the next course of action.

At a High Court hearing in November 2015 Mr Fidler was given a three month prison sentence, suspended until 6 June 2016, to comply with a High Court Injunction Order to demolish the unlawful house and other unlawful structures and return the land to its former state, as per the Council’s original enforcement notices.

Mr Fidler must return the area of the house and conservatory to tarmac chippings and the patio, garden wall, steps and pond areas to grass.

Read more…

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Pig farmers pan planning for generating antibiotic use

Trade body the National Pig Association (NPA) has complained that pig farmers are finding it increasingly difficult to get planning permission to replace worn-out buildings, which is leading to overuse of antibiotics.

The NPA writes:

‘If government and its regulatory agencies are serious about reducing antibiotics on farms, they should take early action to repair local authority planning processes, which have become progressively more clunky in recent years…’

Keeping livestock in new buildings dramatically reduces the need for veterinary interventions, yet pig farmers in particular are finding it increasingly difficult to get planning permission to replace worn-out buildings.

Therefore, as part of its recently introduced Pig Industry Antibiotic Stewardship Programme, NPA is urging Government to issue binding guidance on four fronts:

  • That the level of detail demanded by planners should be proportionate to the scale of the application.?
  • That planners should reject all attempts at interference by animal rights and vegan organisations, as such organisations are opposed to all livestock farming on principle, and their arguments are irrelevant to the planning process.?
  • That planners should not accept representations from third parties after a consultation period has ended, as it adds cost and uncertainty for the planning applicant.?
  • That strict timelines should be observed by statutory consultees such as the Environment Agency, to prevent unfeasible delays in the planning process.

Read the press release

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OUT & ONLINE NOW: IHBContext144 – Restoration at Kew to HGV vibrations; punk heritage and Pirandello’s authenticity to an insider’s insight to philosophy in IHBC accreditation

Context 144The new Context, the IHBC’s membership journal and key heritage sector resource, has just been circulated to members, offering contents that span the full spectrum of practices and principles, alongside the regular sector updates: reports, reviews, events, briefings and much more.

IHBC Director Seán O’Reilly said: ‘We’ll put this issue online immediately, to help extend conservation awareness as far as possible.’

‘That said, the most accessible way learn to about conservation principles, practice and thinking – and in this issue especially to catch the insider track on philosophy for your membership application – is to explore this issue in hard copy, as an IHBC member.’

‘From now on we’ll also be using social media posts to help people focus on CPD and accreditation issues too, so there’s an easier route to the skills covering our Areas of Competence.  Already we give pointers like these in our events postings, but now we are extending this service to Context!’ 

Selections from IHBContext144:

  • Want to find out more about local listing, with PlaceCheck, or WHS fires… or pub values – see the IHBContext144 ‘Briefings
  • Periodically: Distilled heritage periodicals from Bob Kindred IHBC – & 2013 Student Awardee Lisa McIntyre on medieval bishops’ palaces in the JAC!
  • Aimée Felton, IHBC’s first Associate Member, on Insall’s ‘Restoring Kew’s Temperate House
  • Scaffolding – ups and downs: Interventions, covering technology competences and more
  • HGV vibrations – time for re-assessment, says Champion
  • Conservation in the round with high points of high Streets: ‘Putting shops to viable uses consistent with their conservation should seek to encourage maximum use of the building for modern purposes, while also maximising the heritage value.’
  • Richard Bate on conservation services and officers: ‘The paltry savings on modest salaries seems wholly misplaced in relation to the potential benefits of retaining and augmenting conservation staff 

For Context 144:

As ever, themed issues of Context also include more general conservation articles as well as news, book reviews and reports from IHBC’s officers.  Issues are posted online approximately six months after they are issued to members.

If you have any suggestions for Context articles or other material contact Fiona Newton at: editorial@ihbc.org.uk

View the Summer School Context edition and the Context archive, as well as information on Context’s future issues and guidance for authors HERE

For information on Context’s future issues, guidance for authors, and links to the journal’s archives see the IHBC website

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IHBC seeks practitioners’ input and direction on heritage and HE ‘strategies’: England’s NPPF and beyond…

The IHBC has been made aware of uncertainties over the status – or even absence – of local authority Heritage and Historic Environment (HE) strategies as a specific component of Local Plans, and the place of such strategies in Local Plan Inquiries, particularly with regard to the provisions of Section 126 of England’s National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), and now urgently seeks input and updates from members and colleagues.

IHBC’s Research Coordinator Bob Kindred sets the scene: ‘The NPPF recommends that Local Plans should set out a positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment including dealing with heritage at risk.’

‘However while Local Plans invariably include some content on protection of the historic environment, few authorities appear to have adopted a specific heritage strategy including resolution of heritage at risk issues.’

‘The Institute is interested in determining:

  • Whether local authorities have produced stand-alone heritage strategies and if so, which ones
  • Whether and why these were initiated outside the local plan framework; and
  • What specific objectives, outcomes and timescales did these entail, in theory and or practice.’

The NPPF states, in paragraph 126:

‘Local planning authorities should set out in their Local Plan a positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment,29 including heritage assets most at risk through neglect, decay or other threats. In doing so, they should recognise that heritage assets are an irreplaceable resource and conserve them in a manner appropriate to their significance. In developing this strategy, local planning authorities should take into account:

  • the desirability of sustaining and enhancing the significance of heritage assets and putting them to viable uses consistent with their conservation;
  • the wider social, cultural, economic and environmental benefits that conservation of the historic environment can bring;
  • the desirability of new development making a positive contribution to local character and distinctiveness; and
  • opportunities to draw on the contribution made by the historic environment to the character of a place.’

IHBC members are asked to respond to IHBC’s research coordinator Bob Kindred at research@ihbc.org.uk regarding strategies not embedded in Local Plans – preferably with a web-link to a relevant document or as a pdf attachment.

See the NPPF

Read the background 

Read IHBC NewsBlogs covering the NPPF

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Peter Ainsworth: Chairman of The Churches Conservation Trust

The Queen has announced the appointment of the former Shadow Secretary of State for Culture, Peter Ainsworth, as Chairman of Trustees of The Churches Conservation Trust from July 2016. 

The Churches Conservation Trust writes:

‘Peter has been UK Chair of the Big Lottery Fund since 2011 and is a Board member of the Environment Agency. He was previously Chairman of Plantlife International and the Elgar Foundation. A former investment banker, he is a founding partner of sustainability consultancy the Robertsbridge Group. He is also a Patron of the College of St Barnabas.

Peter has served as Shadow Secretary of State for Culture, Shadow Secretary of State of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, and was Member of Parliament for East Surrey for 18 years until 2010. His involvement in the heritage sector dates back to 1995, when he was appointed Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Secretary of State for National Heritage; he was a member of the DCMS Select Committee in 2009-10.

Peter Ainsworth said: ‘I am delighted to be joining The Churches Conservation Trust, an organisation which is pivotal to caring for our nation’s heritage whilst promoting cultural values, the arts, and regeneration. It returns important buildings to the heart of their communities.  I am hugely impressed by the Trust’s inspiring dedication to the communities it serves, and look forward to joining nearly two million visitors a year in enjoying some of its 349 wonderful churches.’

Crispin Truman, Chief Executive of The Churches Conservation Trust said: ‘We’re delighted that Peter is joining The Churches Conservation Trust as Chairman, and are very much looking forward to working with him. Peter brings a wealth of experience and opportunity to the CCT; not only is he a highly accomplished board chairman, but he brings the public-facing skills and the commitment we need at the CCT to help the Board and team raise our profile and attract wider support so we can secure the long-term future of our collection. I am hugely looking forward to showing him some of our stunning churches over the summer.’

The current Chairman Dr Loyd Grossman CBE FSA completes his second term in July. Previous Chairmen have included Rt Hon Frank Field MP, Sir David Stephens KCB CVO and Ivor Bulmer-Thomas CBE FS.

Read more….

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Review of Scottish Planning report out

The report of an independent review of the Scottish planning system, commissioned by Scottish Minsters in September 2015, has just been issued, entitled ‘Empowering Planning to Deliver Great Places’, with the aims of the review being ‘to provide an opportunity to simplify and strengthen the planning system, to empower all parties to deliver positive change and to re-establish the profession as a leader, an innovator and, above all, a strong and effective advocate for the public interest.’

Some may be interested to note that the recommendations do not include the introduction of third-party rights of appeal. 

Authors – Crawford Beveridge, Petra Biberbach and John Hamilton – state:

‘From the outset, it was clear to us that the main structure of our planning system is not broken. However, it was also clear that for the potential of planning to be realised, a strong commitment to change existing practices and culture, and to re-focus the profession’s improvement agenda will be required.  The Scottish Ministers set out 6 themes for us to address and as the review progressed it was obvious that those were the right areas for priority action.  Our report builds on these themes and proposes a package of measures for change.  Some of the recommendations represent large scale and in our view, game changing, proposals.  Others are smaller scale improvements to ensure existing processes are as effective as possible.  Some would require legislative change, others could be done quickly and easily with collective buy in and co-operation and embed a culture of inclusion.’

‘The report finds the planning system should be strengthened to achieve the vision established by the Planning Etc (Scotland) Act 2006.’

Planning Minister Kevin Stewart said the review would inform a ‘new, focused and revitalised planning system’.

The BBC states that :

  • The report calls for strong and flexible local development plans, which should be updated regularly with a ‘20-year vision’, and an enhanced national planning framework.
  • Recommendations also focus on delivering more, better housing, and improving infrastructure – local authorities generally were criticised as ‘appearing to lack the confidence to invest in infrastructure’.
  • The group recommend setting up a national infrastructure agency, with statutory powers, and asking the government to examine options for a national or regional infrastructure levy to raise funds.
  • And it said the Scottish government should ‘lead by example’ in public service reform, and increase planning fees on major applications ‘substantially’. 

The Report concludes:

‘9.1. We recognise that many of these changes are potentially far reaching, and that the recommendations are being made at a time when there is already pressure on public sector resources. However, by making a relatively modest investment and prioritising efforts on areas where there will be greatest impact, the recommendations set out here should make the planning system much more efficient and effective.

9.2. We have been unable to address every issue that has been raised but we are confident that we have prioritised the right areas.

9.3. We recognise that views vary on many of the key challenges. However, we have identified where there are widely recognised issues arising, and have considered how improvements under the six key headings can work together to achieve significant change.

9.4. Our review has been strategic and we are conscious that the practicalities of some of our recommendations require further consideration and consultation. In responding to our report, the Scottish Government will need to consider how a balance can be struck between bringing forward short term solutions and pursuing more fundamental changes over the longer term. We look forward to seeing the Scottish Ministers’ response to our recommendations in due course.’

See the analysis by the BBC’s Douglas Fraser

IHBC will report on the reaction of Scottish Ministers to the content and recommendations of the review as it is available.

See the report and its recommendations

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